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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cook'n Misty View Post
    opiates work best if they do a liver pass to convert into other opiate goodness
    While this may be the case for some opiates/opioids, it is not for morphine (at least not at bioavailability levels consistent with oral administration).

    http://www.painphysicianjournal.com/...;S133-S153.pdf
    Morphine is metabolized by demethylation and glucuronidation; glucuronidation is the predominant mode of metabolism, producing morphine-6 glucuro-nide (M6G) and morphine-3 glucuronide (M3G) in a ratio of 6:1
    M3G is inactive as an opioid agonist. M6G is active, however has ~4 times less affinity for the u-opioid receptor.
    As popper stated, oral bioavailability of morphine is quite low due to poor lipid solubility and rapid conjugation with glucuronic acid.

    http://www.anesthesia-analgesia.org/content/102/6/1789.long
    In contrast to morphine, M6G causes long-term pain relief in humans, although its analgesic potency is less than that of morphine. As a result of this decreased potency, two to three times the IV morphine dose is required to reduce acute pain in postoperative patients to acceptable levels
    Stay safe regardless of which method you choose

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  3. #12
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    Frenzal is offline Highly Valued TripMe Senior Contributor
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    Cracks me up that when they're not super dodgy, opiate threads are often some of the cleanest info on this site.

    Good work guys.
    I hate people who take drugs.

    Like police, customs, parents...

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeijin View Post
    While this may be the case for some opiates/opioids, it is not for morphine (at least not at bioavailability levels consistent with oral administration).



    M3G is inactive as an opioid agonist. M6G is active, however has ~4 times less affinity for the u-opioid receptor.
    As popper stated, oral bioavailability of morphine is quite low due to poor lipid solubility and rapid conjugation with glucuronic acid.



    Stay safe regardless of which method you choose
    Please explain how morphine is matibilised via demethlyisation when no methyl molecule is present, thats correct in the sense if it was codiene but that looks wrong to me, maybe you could copy and paste a correction?
    Last edited by Cook'n Misty; 27-03-2012 at 09:27 PM.
    Run and tell that home boy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cook'n Misty View Post
    Please explain how morphine is matibilised via demethlyisation when no methyl molecule is present, thats correct in the sense if it was codiene but that looks wrong to me, maybe you could copy and paste a correction?
    Normorphine (desmethylmorphine) is the n-demethylated version of morphine, just like norcodeine/codeine.

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  8. #15
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    Penis From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search ‹ Whether to make the |reason= mandatory for the {{cleanup}} template is being discussed. See the request for comment to help reach a consensus.› This article may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia's quality standards. The specific problem is: See Discussion. Please help improve this article if you can. The talk page may contain suggestions. (November 2011) For the human organ, see Human penis."PENIS" redirects here. For the spectroscopy acronym, see Proton-enhanced nuclear induction spectroscopy. A selection of penises from different species at the Icelandic Phallological MuseumThe penis (plural penises, penes) is a biological feature of male animals including both vertebrates (creatures with a backbone) and invertebrates. It is a reproductive, intromittent organ that additionally serves as the urinal duct in placental mammals.Contents [hide] 1 Etymology 2 In different animals 2.1 Vertebrates 2.1.1 Mammals 2.1.1.1 Domesticated mammals 2.1.1.2 Other mammals 2.1.2 Other vertebrates 2.2 Invertebrates 3 Cultural uses 4 See also 5 References 6 External links Etymology A human penis, flaccid and erect.The word "penis" is taken from the Latin word for "tail." Some derive that from Indo-European *pesnis, and the Greek word πέος = "penis" from Indo-European *pesos. Prior to the adoption of the Latin word in English the penis was referred to as a "yard". The Oxford English Dictionary cites an example of the word yard used in this sense from 1379,[1] and notes that in his Physical Dictionary of 1684, Steven Blankaart defined the word penis as "the Yard, made up of two nervous Bodies, the Channel, Nut, Skin, and Fore-skin, etc."[2]As with nearly any aspect of the body involved in sexual or excretory functions, the penis is the subject of many slang words and euphemisms for it, a particularly common and longstanding one being "cock".The Latin word "phallus" (from Greek φαλλος) is sometimes used to describe the penis, although "phallus" originally was used to describe images, pictorial or carved, of the penis.[3]Pizzle, an archaic English word for penis, of Low German or Dutch origin, it is now used to denote the penis of a non human animal.The adjectival form of the word penis is penile. This adjective is commonly used in describing various accessory structures of male copulatory organs found in many kinds of invertebrate animals.There are dozens of slang words, euphemisms and synonyoms for the penis in English and in other languages. See WikiSaurusenis for a list of alternative words for penis.
    Run and tell that home boy

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    What on earth do you look up in your spare time lmao

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    Where did you buy these??

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    Weed in NZ
    wondering this too

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